The Classic Crackled Kilauea vase


The Classic Crackled Kilauea vase. The Classic Crackled Kilauea vase  renders the dramatic magma flowing down the mountain at the Pu’u O’o cone all the way down to meet the ocean. This on-going eruption has produced a broad field of new lava flows that have buried over 117 sq km of the volcano’s south flank

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Kilauea Crackled Surface flow vase


The Kilauea Crackled Surface Flow vase. The Kilauea Crackled Surface Flow vase  renders the impressive lava that is continually flowing on the Surface of the earth at the Kilauea volcano.  The dramatic magma and the heat are represented by this exceptional red and the crackled texture, representing the cracking of the surface that happens as

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Kilauea Inversion vase


The Kilauea Inversion vase. The Kilauea Inversion vase  represents the atmospheric inversion layer effect, when the temperature inverts and the cold air is on the ground while the warm air is aloft.  This traps the volcanic smoke near the ground creating a layer of “vog” in low lying areas. When illuminated by the the red

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The Black Kilauea Surface Flow vase


The Black Kilauea Surface Flow vase. The Kilauea Black Surface Flow vase renders the dramatic magma flowing down the mountain at the Pu’u O’o cone .  This on-going eruption has produced a broad field of new lava flows that have buried over 117 sq km of the volcano’s south flank and added more than 230

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The Lava Crust Kilauea Vase


The Lava Crust Kilauea vase. The Lava Crust Kilauea Vase renders the dramatic dry hardened skin that forms on the surface of a fresh lava outbreak. This black frozen skin often breaks apart and gets carried along with the hot liquid lava beneath, as the pressure to flow down hill pulls the fresh lava further

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The Puako Petroglyph vase


The Puako Petroglyph vase. The Puakō petroglyph series is inspired by the historic preserve of  petroglyph fields north of Kailua-Kona. This preserve offers a unique view into the history of Hawaii. Some of these petroglyphs date back to the 16th century. The word “Petroglyph”  comes from the Greek words, “petros” for rock, and “glyphein” to

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